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Department/School

Sociology and Anthropology

Abstract/Excerpt

The sociology of religion in the United States has considerable experience with the study of immigrant religion. Unfortunately, the assimilationist model that has dominated this study is only partly relevant to contemporary transnational migrations. This chapter assesses the latest version of this assimilationist model, R. Stephen Warner’s “new congregationalism”. While rightly focusing attention on the role that local congregations play in adjusting immigrants to American life, this approach underplays two key aspects of contemporary immigrant religiosity: 1) the transnational religious networks that make immigration no one-way street; and 2) the importance of non-churched religious practices, with their implications for the sustenance of religious identity. These two structural matters, along with the issue of race, question the completeness of "the new congregationalism" as a paradigm for under- standing immigrant religion. They also throw doubt on any point of view that focuses primarily on religion’s role in adjusting immigrants to their host societies.

Document Type

Chapter

Book Title

Religion in the Context of African Migration

Editors

Afe Adogame & Cordula Weissköppel

Series Title

Bayreuth African Studies Series, #75

Publisher

University of Bayreuth

Place of Publication

Bayreuth, Germany

Publication Date

2005

Pages

23-41

ISBN

9783927510890

Keywords

African religion, migration, immigration, transnational religion, globalization

Disciplines

Christian Denominations and Sects | Christianity | Missions and World Christianity | Sociology of Religion

Document Version

Preprint

Networks, Homes, or Congregations: Exploring the Locus of Immigrant Religiosity

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