Publication Date

4-30-2014

DOI (Digital Object Identifier)

10.26716/redlands/doctor/2014.8

Department

Leadership and Higher Education

Degree

Doctor of Education (Ed.D)

Dissertation Chair

Ross E. Mitchell, Ph.D.

Committee Members

James R. Valadez, Ph.D.

Jose W. Lalas, Ph.D.

Keywords

social sciences; education; Hispanic students; immigrant education; immigrant youth; parental involvement

Disciplines

Educational Leadership | Educational Sociology | Secondary Education

Abstract

This study examines the notion that relationships matter and that social capital may offer immigrant students a fighting chance at increasing their odds of becoming college eligible. Students—particularly immigrant students—often find themselves in circumstances that do not directly position them for college. This study used existing theory to formulate a set of indicators to predict home-based, school-based, and peer-based social capital. Linear regression results revealed modest predictability for each form of social capital. Of the logistic regression models, three variables were statistically significant: socioeconomic status (SES), Hispanic students, and home-based social capital. These results indicate the need for greater emphasis on college readiness, whereby both parents and students take more active roles in accessing pertinent information, preparing a precollegiate curriculum, and planning earlier for postsecondary education.

Comments

© 2013 Jean V. Ngo-Lopez

All Rights Reserved

ISBN: 9781321205237

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