Publication Date

1945

DOI (Digital Object Identifier)

10.26716/redlands/master/1945.1

Degree

Master of Arts (MA)

Committee or Advisor Chair

Dr. Glen Carlson

Committee Members

Edith A. Hill

Bernard L. Hyink

Keywords

sociology, race and culture, assimilation, Mexican-American population, San Bernardino, California

Disciplines

Chicana/o Studies | Civic and Community Engagement | Cultural History | Demography, Population, and Ecology | Place and Environment | Race and Ethnicity | Social History | Sociology | United States History

Abstract

The body of this paper is intended to be a book manuscript. It is hoped that its readers will be those who work directly with Mexican-Americans--employers, school-teachers, law-enforcement officers, social-workers, church leaders, parent-teacher groups, union officials, public agency employees, and many others in communities in our Southwest. It is also hoped that the book will reach and interest a general reading public in the United States. It has become almost axiomatic to say that no minority problem is, to-day, merely regional or even national in scope. The currency of the axiom by no means alters its essential truth. Our continued friendship with Latin America, a mutual necessity, depends, to a greater degree than most persons in the United States realize, upon our treatment of Latin-American minorities within the United States. Our sins of omission and commission toward these minorities make headlines in Latin-American capitals, where there is a realistic tendency to judge the validity of our international intentions by what we do in our own backyard.

Comments

Department: Sociology

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Thesis Location

 
COinS