For OER Reviewers

Thank you for considering the review of an open, educational resource (OER). Publishing OER are part of Armacost Library's values and mission to support teaching and learning, diversify the voices of authority, and prevent further commercialization of educational and research processes.

By submitting an open review, you agree to the terms of the Publication Agreement provided under Submission Guidelines. Should you submit a review solicited by the Armacost Library, you acknowledge that your review will be a post-publication review and used primarily to inform potential OER adopters and any subsequent editions. The Creative Common license chosen by the OER author will also be applicable to your review.

Out of a value for work-life balance, the Armacost Library asks that you address the following questions in your review to a reasonable extent. Although less than comprehensive reviews will be accepted, reviews that compromise principles of respect, thoughtfulness, and expertise will be rejected.

Questions for Peer Reviewers

  • With what expertise or experience do you bring to this review? Have you taught a similar course?
  • How well does this work represent a diversity of voices and experiences?
  • How responsive is this work to issues of equity and inclusion?
  • How suitable is this work to its target audience? Are there other audiences for whom this may be suitable (e.g., practitioners, general public)?
  • Can you speak to the work's accuracy? Comprehensiveness?
  • Is it well-written, clearly, and consistently organized?
  • Are there topics that were overlooked? Are there areas that received undue attention?
  • What sets this work apart from others in the field?
  • What do you see as the strengths and weaknesses of the work?
  • Do you have any additional suggestions?
  • Would the completed textbook be one you would recommend to students and colleagues? Have/will you adopt or adapt this work for your course?

Questions for Student Reviewers

  • What experience do you have with this work? If used in a class, which class was it? Were you on a semester- or quarter-system? Was it for a graduate or undergraduate course?
  • How well does this work represent a diversity of voices and experiences?
  • How responsive is this work to issues of equity and inclusion?
  • How suitable is this work to its target audience?
  • Is it well-written, clearly, and consistently organized?
  • What helped with student learning? What hindered student learning?
  • What comments did you hear about this work from fellow classmates?
  • What do you see as the strengths and weaknesses of the work?
  • If you were invited to be a co-creator of a subsequent edition of work, how might you improve it?
These guidelines have been adapted from the following resources: